Posts Tagged "women writers"

#NastyWomenWriters—Ursula K. Le Guin: Women, Writing and Motherhood, by: Theresa C. Dintino

#NastyWomenWriters—Ursula K. Le Guin: (b. 1929) Women, Writing and Motherhood, by: Theresa C. Dintino When I was in my late twenties, there was one essay I read in the New York Times Book Review that moved me so deeply that I immediately signed up for a summer writing workshop where the writer of the essay was teaching. It was not like me to go to writing workshops anymore at that age. I was in complete burnout with the workshop culture from my college writing program and the many writing workshops I had gone to after. I was what I would call a “beginning writer” at that point, trying to...

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#Nasty Women Writers—Zora Neale Hurston: The Real Deal, by Maria Dintino

#Nasty Women Writers—Zora Neale Hurston: The Real Deal 1891-1960 by Maria Dintino On learning that Zora Neale Hurston died in a county home alone and broke, I felt angry and sad. But after reading Alice Walker’s article In Search of Zora Neale Hurston that appeared in Ms magazine in 1975, I agree with Alice. Zora left no room in her life for pity and “was not a teary sort herself.” Zora was a force and through her writing, we get that. Learn more about the #NastyWomenWriters project here When I moved to St Augustine, Florida, I noticed a historical marker in front of a house indicating Zora...

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#NastyWomenWriters–A Voice that Echoes in My Body: The Prose and Poetry of Adrienne Rich, by Theresa C. Dintino

A Voice that Echoes in My Body The Prose and Poetry of Adrienne Rich American, 1929-2012 by Theresa C. Dintino   Of all the lines written in the English language, the ones that have inspired, moved and meant the most to me are the ones penned by Adrienne Rich. My worn and tattered copy of The Dream of a Common Language, read, loved and turned to so many times, continues to be my favorite book to take off the shelf and revisit. Occasionally, when I remember (or hear as a whisper in my ear) one of the lines from a poem printed in it, my body fills with excitement and deep memory or what...

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#NastyWomanWriters: Trotula of Salerno by Theresa C. Dintino

#NastyWomanWriters: Trotula of Salerno, 11th century, Salerno, Italia by Theresa C. Dintino Because there are many women who have numerous diverse illnesses—some of them almost fatal—and because they are also ashamed to reveal and tell their distress to any man… to assist women, I intend to write of how to help their secret maladies so that one woman may aid another in her illness and not divulge her secrets. ~Trotula of Salerno, 11th century Italy. Trotula was one of the most famous physicians of her time. Her work was devoted to alleviating the suffering of women. Trotula taught at the...

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Knowing the Library of Your Soul: The Key to Retaining Your Power

Membranes of Hope: Part 1 What is the Library of your Soul? Do you know it? Can you see it? What does it look like? Can you feel it? How does it feel? We each have this unique space within us. This space needs to be nurtured, protected, and cherished. It is yours alone. How do we attend to this precious interior space? Let me begin by referring to a woman who fought valiantly for her own: Virginia Woolf. Virginia Woolf and A Room of One’s Own Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) a writer, intellectual and feminist, who, in her seminal book, A Room Of One’s Own, wrote: “A woman must have money and a...

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