Posts Tagged "minoan crete"

New 2nd edition paperback of my first novel, Ode to Minoa: Journey of a Snake Priestess

I have recently had the opportunity to revisit and publish a second edition paperback of my first novel, Ode to Minoa: Journey of a Snake Priestess I began this book in 1995 when my daughter was two and I was able to focus on writing full time again. I had “discovered” the Goddess in 1992 and intended to write a book about Lilith. I did massive research on Lilith but when I finally sat down to write this book it flipped into the novel Ode to Minoa. Lilith appears in its pages as a character.  I wrote the novel Ode to Minoa from a desire to imagine the past and also project into the future. I...

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Stories They Told Me

Announcing the new publication of the second novel in my Crete series, Stories They Told Me, in paperback and ebook format. My first novel, Ode to Minoa, is the journey of snake priestess-prophetess, Aureillia, in Minoan Crete (1600 BCE) who, through a series of trance visions, witnesses the murder of the Goddess and the future of women as a result of this loss. After I completed that novel I wanted to understand what happened to men with the loss and murder of the Goddess. Stories They Told Me is the culmination of that effort. The novel explores the separation of men and women and the...

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What is Minoan Crete?

Crete in the Bronze Age was an island surrounded by a world of change.  In fact, the Minoan society was one of the last holdouts for the worship of an all encompassing universal life source envisioned in the form of the Goddess; one that had previously thrived throughout most of Europe and the Mediterranean. The archeological finds uncovered by Arthur Evans at the beginning of the 20th Century from the “Minoan” Era are named after the legendary King Minos of Greek Mythology.  Evidence for a king, however, has yet to be found.  Instead, statuettes and images of Goddesses and priestesses...

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Priestess Diviners of Minoan Crete

In the archaeological remains of the Minoan Era of Crete, statues of priestesses in ritual attire holding a snake in either hand are found. The expression in their eyes and their enlarged ears lets us know these women are in a state of trance. In some of the temple rooms of the sprawling building found in Knossos, there were also snake pits. In small doses snake venom is a hallucinogen. Clearly these priestesses were engaging with the snake and her medicine to receive oracular information. In my novel Ode to Minoa, Aureillia—the protagonist, receives the bite of the snake at certain phases...

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